Shining a light on Hingham news

The Harborlight

Shining a light on Hingham news

The Harborlight

Shining a light on Hingham news

The Harborlight

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NCAA Women’s March Madness

Paving the road for women’s sport all over the nation
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Notre Dame’s Becky Obinma (10), Maddy Westbeld (21), and Sonia Citron (11) defend Ole Miss’ Kharyssa Richardson (33) in the second round of the 2024 tournament. (Credit: Matt Cashore, USA TODAY Sports)

Every year, people across the country create March Madness brackets, but how many of those brackets are actually focused on the women’s tournament? In past years, not many. Despite the undeniable talent in the women’s tournament, people’s eyes have constantly been focused on the men’s. 

However, this year appears to be different…

For NCAA Women’s Basketball, 2024 has been unlike any other in terms of the talent level, number of viewers, or amount of attention the tournament has gotten. Sophomore Tessa Grossman explains, “If you really watch a competitive game, there will be no doubt in your mind that the women’s tournament holds an enormous amount of potential and talent. They are just getting started.”

Last year, the Iowa vs. LSU’s National Championship game got the ball rolling, as the matchup invited 10 million viewers, a record for an NCAA women’s basketball game. With the added bonus of some heat between LSU’s Angel Reese and Iowa’s Caitlin Clark, the 2023 tournament set the following year up for tremendous success. 

The easiest answer for all the excitement surrounding women’s college basketball is none other than star player, Caitlin Clark. The 22 year old on the Iowa Hawkeyes has single handedly changed the game. Averaging 28.7 points per game and arguably the best shooter in the tournament, Clark truly stands out. On February 15, 2024, she scored her career high of 49 points against Michigan. The stellar athlete not only boosts the women’s tournament hype but also inspires girls across the country that hard work really can pay off. 

Although Clark’s contributions stand out, the tournament includes numerous talented athletes such as USC’s freshman Juju Watkins, UConn’s senior Paige Beuckers, and Stanford’s senior Cameron Brink. Collectively, they have brought recognition and praise to the NCAA Womens’ March Madness tournament. 

Ryan Hallisey, a student athlete at Hingham High School plays both Varsity field hockey and lacrosse, says, “Honestly, Caitlin Clark and these other amazing women are not only changing the basketball world. Their impact on women’s sports can be felt all across the country.” 

Although the tournament is still in progress, the unprecedented growth that women’s college basketball has endured in the past two years is remarkable. By drawing attention to the fact that women’s sports really can be just as exciting as the men’s, March Madness paves the way for women’s sports all over the country. 

Women’s College Basketball stars (from right to left) Juju Watkins, Cameron Brink, Caitlin Clark, Alissa Pili. (Credit: ESPN images)
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